(Source: this-bi-guy, via dilfcomplex)

perfectlydreadful:

White People: The Middle East is so barbaric. They’ll cut off a person’s hand just for stealing!

White People when an unarmed black kid is murdered by police in America: Yeah, but he shoplifted some cigarillos, so…

(via dilfcomplex)

faineemae:

"You plagiarized a sentence in an essay? Expelled & we’ll make it hard for you to enroll into another school ever again."

"You raped and assaulted a student on campus? You can come back to school."

fuck the education system

(via ambydsolis)

"Young men need to be socialized in such a way that rape is as unthinkable to them as cannibalism."

— Mary Pipher, Reviving Ophelia (via wetforest)

(Source: larmoyante, via tinyhorsedepartment)

fatted:

Family: *says something racist*
Family: *says something sexist*
Family: *says something homophobic*
Family: *makes fun of people with tattoos*
Family: *tells you why you’re bad at life*
Family: why don’t you wanna spend time with us?

(via urielseptim)

mexicanfoodporn:

Una carnita asada. Ahí por si tienes dudas de qué bonito es México. 
I have mentioned this before, but “carne asada” in Mexico means more than just the type of meat youll put in your tortilla. Carne Asada is a revered social gathering, where friends or family come together, eat and yes.. drink of course. Actually, In some parts of the country (Northern Mexico) Carne Asada, is almost like a religion, people will sometimes ditch the “club” plans on a saturday night in order to attend a ‘carne asada’ with their friends (some will eat, pregame then head to the clubs too). Believe me, stuffing your face with food, with close friends to share and copious amounts of booze, is ten times better than to see that bouncers face. 

mexicanfoodporn:

Una carnita asada. Ahí por si tienes dudas de qué bonito es México. 

I have mentioned this before, but “carne asada” in Mexico means more than just the type of meat youll put in your tortilla. Carne Asada is a revered social gathering, where friends or family come together, eat and yes.. drink of course. Actually, In some parts of the country (Northern Mexico) Carne Asada, is almost like a religion, people will sometimes ditch the “club” plans on a saturday night in order to attend a ‘carne asada’ with their friends (some will eat, pregame then head to the clubs too). Believe me, stuffing your face with food, with close friends to share and copious amounts of booze, is ten times better than to see that bouncers face. 

(via calilock)

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Emma Tenayuca was a Mexican American activist and educator. Born December 21, 1916 in San Antonio, Texas, Tenayuca was a key figure in Texan labor and civil rights activism during the 1930’s, where she organized protests over the beatings of Mexican migrants by United States Border Patrol agents and labor strikes to end unfair wages. As a union activist, she also founded two international ladies’ garment workers unions and was involved in both the Worker’s Alliance of America and Woman’s League for Peace and Freedom. 
Throughout her fight for labor and civil rights, Tenayuca was arrested many times under charges of “disturbing the peace”, even though her participation during protests was strictly peaceful. She was also targeted for being a member of the Communist Party, which resulted in her being “blacklisted” and forced to move out of the San Antonio area 1939. After leaving her hometown she went on to attend San Francisco State College where she majored in Education. Years later Tenayuca returned to San Antonio and earned a master’s in Education from Our Lady of the Lake University, leading her to eventually go on to teach in the Harlandale School District until her retirement in 1982.
Shortly after her retirement Emma Tenayuca was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and passed away on July 23, 1999.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Emma Tenayuca was a Mexican American activist and educator. Born December 21, 1916 in San Antonio, Texas, Tenayuca was a key figure in Texan labor and civil rights activism during the 1930’s, where she organized protests over the beatings of Mexican migrants by United States Border Patrol agents and labor strikes to end unfair wages. As a union activist, she also founded two international ladies’ garment workers unions and was involved in both the Worker’s Alliance of America and Woman’s League for Peace and Freedom. 

Throughout her fight for labor and civil rights, Tenayuca was arrested many times under charges of “disturbing the peace”, even though her participation during protests was strictly peaceful. She was also targeted for being a member of the Communist Party, which resulted in her being “blacklisted” and forced to move out of the San Antonio area 1939. After leaving her hometown she went on to attend San Francisco State College where she majored in Education. Years later Tenayuca returned to San Antonio and earned a master’s in Education from Our Lady of the Lake University, leading her to eventually go on to teach in the Harlandale School District until her retirement in 1982.

Shortly after her retirement Emma Tenayuca was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and passed away on July 23, 1999.

(via based-bud)